Learning to Read and Write Chinese: 茅塞頓開

July 30th, 2010 § 0 comments § permalink

茅 máo,  Reeds, rushes, grass; surname
塞 shì, Room, home, house, chamber
茅室, Combined means bathroom

頓 dùn, dú, zhūn, Pause, stop/ bow, kowtow/ arrange
開 kāi, open/initiate, begin, start
頓開, Combined means to clear up or expelled from within

茅室頓開, you guessed it :D. Yes, your plugged pipes has been relieved in the bathroom. Alleluia! This also mean your stuck thoughts or problems is suddenly relived or thought through, an epiphany.

stroke, audio, and more @ MDBG

Learning to Read and Write Chinese: 萬歲

July 30th, 2010 § 0 comments § permalink

萬 wàn,  ten thousand
歲  suì, year of age
萬歲, wàn suì, long live (the king, the revolution etc)! / Your Majesty / His Majesty

In the Chinese dramas I watch, the officials of the kingdom would all-hail to the king in unison, “萬歲, 萬歲, 萬萬歲”, wishing him longevity. In today’s slang, it means to me “you are above all, the very best”. For example you can refer to objects things and people if you like,  sleep 萬歲 , “Sleeping is above all the best” or “Long live sleep”

stroke, audio, and more @ MDBG

Learning to Read and Write Chinese: “Add Gas” or “+ Gas” or “加油”

January 18th, 2010 § 0 comments § permalink

Gas? Passing gas? ewww… My Car needs gas? You’re so close! What happens when you “add gas” to a vehicle? Your vehicle is filled with energy and ready to go further and faster. Right? Below are the two Chinese Characters that translates “Add Gas”.

加, jiā, to add / plus
油, yóu, oil/fuel (you can say it means Gas too, Gas = Fuel)

“Add Gas” is a term/slang I learned, among Chinese friends, to cheer you on and to encourage you to keep it up. Or…just  maybe…your car does need a refill 🙂

stroke, audio, and more @ MDBG

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